Sound in 2nd Class

Sound is an energy, caused by vibrations that makes sound waves.

We completed a dancing rice experiment to see sound vibrations. We made ‘String telephones’ to hear sound waves.

We investigated which material would be the best sound insulator. We measured how far away from the sound we needed to walk before the sound disappeared when blocked by each material. We predicted that the cardboard box would be the best sound insulator and we were right!

Some materials allow sound to pass through them easily. Other materials absorb sound.

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Science Exhibition ~ ASD Class

STEM Activity: To programme a Bee-bot to move in the shape of a circle

Skills Development

Working Scientifically

  • Predicting
  • Observing
  • Investigating and experimenting
  • Recording and communicating

Equipment:

  • Bee-bots
  • Markers
  • Rubber bands
  • Paper

What we did:

Lesson 1

  • We watched a fun video about the circle with a catchy song.
  • Lorchán wrote the word ‘circle’ on the whiteboard.
  • Each of us had a turn at drawing a circle on the whiteboard.
  • We did a hunt around the classroom to find circular objects. We really enjoyed this.
  • We sat at the group work table and read through our Bee-bot social story.
  • Thomas ordered sandpaper numerals from 1-4 on the table and we looked at the 4 pieces of equipment which we needed for the experiment.
  • We each took a turn at programming the Bee-bot to move in the shape of a circle by pressing the right arrow 4 times.
  • Ciarán cleverly pointed out that we could also press the left arrow and it would still move in the shape of a circle.

Lesson 2

  • We watched the video about the circle again.
  • We recapped Lesson 1 by looking at photographs on the interactive whiteboard which were taken during the lesson.
  • We discussed how we could confirm our observations and prove that the Bee-bot can move in the shape of a circle.
  • We observed Ms. Groarke attaching the marker to the Bee-bot with an elastic band.
  • Each of us took a turn at programming the Bee-bot to move in the shape of a circle with the marker attached. We pressed the right arrow 4 times and ‘Go.’ Then we pressed the left arrow 4 times and ‘Go.’
  • Sometimes we had to press ‘Go’ more than once and adjust the marker so that it left a more visible circle on paper.
  • We labelled our work with lots of care as you can see.

Lesson 3

  • We watched the video about the circle one more time.
  • We recapped Lessons 1 and 2 using photographs.
  • We discussed if 2 or more Bee-bots could move in the shape of a circle at the same time.
  • We agreed that that they could once we press the right/left arrow the same number of times and ‘Go’ at the same time.
  • We prepared 2 Bee-bots by turning them on.
  • We pressed the right arrow 4 times on both Bee-bots.
  • We practiced pressing ‘Go’ on the 2 Bee-bots at the same time and observed them mostly moving in unison.
  • After a few trials, we did it one last time and video recorded our results.

We hope you enjoy reading about our contribution to this year’s Science Exhibition!

Lorchán, Thomas, Ciarán, Seán and Akshay

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Eco Friendly Newspaper Bags

Take a look at our Eco friendly bags. We researched gift bags and discovered that the majority of them are made in China. We wanted to reduce the air/land and sea miles used and thereby reduce our carbon footprint by making bags of our own using old newspapers.

Design a Bridge Challenge

Task: Design a bridge

Method:

Using blocks, paper, books and crayons to test we designed bridges to see which ones were stronger and could hold the most amount of crayons. We manipulated our structures to increase their strength by folding the paper used, using double layers of paper, creating arches and structures for extra support.

Conclusion:

The material from which a structure is made is important but you can strengthen a material by changing is shape. Bridge designers often use different shapes for example: arches and triangles. The curve of the arch spreads the load on the bridge and makes it stronger.

 

STEM Activities in Room 10!

We completed two light experiments last week to show the splitting and mixing of light/colour.

Experiment 1: We made rainbow spinners to show that when the rainbow colours are spun quickly, your eyes can’t keep up and the spinner appears white.

Experiment 2: We explored white light and colour by placing skittles and the outer circle of a plate. We added water and observed what happened. The colours moved towards the middle and created a whirl of colour.

 

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STEM Launch with the Minister of Education

We were honoured to have the Minister of Education Richard Bruton launch the policy and implementation plan for STEM in education in Ireland. Minister Bruton had the chance to talk to come of the students about what they have been learning in science and maths. Here are a few pictures from the day.

 

 

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2nd class Investigates :The Science of Sound

Experiment 1: Count the Taps!

What were we investigating?

Do sound waves travel better through a gas or a solid?

What did we do?

We learned that the air that we talk through is a gas and it can be interfered with by things like the wind.

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We tested to see if we could count a tapping noise more clearly if we listened with our ear on the desk.

What did we learn?

In a solid you can hear the sound waves clearly. We weren’t sure however, if they were clearer.

Experiment  2: Making Rice Jump

What were we investigating?

Can we see sound waves at work?

What did we do?

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We placed some cling film over a bowl and then placed some rice on top of the cling film. We then banged a drum close to the rice to see if the sound waves could make the rice jump.

What did we learn?

Even from a distance away the sound waves travelled from the drum hit the cling film and made the rice jump. Even though they are invisible we can see the force moving the rice.

Experiment  3: String Phones

What were we investigating?

Can we make a “phone” to send a message from our class across the front of the school to Mr Scott’s room (Room 5)?

What did we do?

Step 1: We designed and made our own string phone’s and tested them to see if they worked.

 

One group tried putting two strings in their phone.(It didn’t seem  to work any better)

Step 2: We measured to see how far apart our phones stretched and we tested to see if the sound got weaker on the longest phones.

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Step 3: We then made another test string phone 4 metres long and we tested to see if it still worked.

Step 4: We measured the distance from our classroom to Mr Scott’s using a trundle wheel. It was  21 metres and 61 centimetres window to window.

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Step 5: We made our new extra-long string phone. We sent a group down to Room 5  to listen for the message and left  two children in our class to call  it out.  Nobody but the callers knew the message (It was: “ Ireland are going to win!”).

 

 

Step 6: We  decided to do a final test to see if we could “listen in” on the line between the two classrooms.

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What did we learn?

We learned lots but the most important bits are:

  • The string has to be pulled tight for the phone to work well
  • Putting two strings on the phone might actually make it harder to hear a message.
  • The quality of the phone does not diminish between 1 and 4 metres.
  • On a very long string- phone the message isn’t as clear as on a short one but we were still able to  work  out the message that was transmitted.
  • By attaching another string to the main line we can “listen in”.