Planting Seeds

Here in 1st Class Room 9, we love experimenting and learning about different things in our environment. On Friday 27th April, we planted some cress and basil seeds that one of our classmates brought into school that day. The seeds had come with smoothie cartons and so were held inside small cardboard circles. This cardboard is biodegradable- that means that it will break down, or decompose.

Broad bean seeds: 

We decided to experiment with planting some broad bean seeds to see if they will grow in the same conditions as the cress and basil seeds. We planted these in clear plastic containers so that we can see any changes that happen. We monitored our broad bean seeds and this is what we found: on Friday 27th April we planted the seeds; on Wednesday 2nd May they had started to open; on Thursday 3rd of May the roots had started to come down and now on Friday 4th of May the roots are much longer!

Cress seeds:  We put the cardboard circles (containing the cress/basil seeds) into three separate plastic white cups in between some cotton wool buds. We made sure to keep the cotton wool wet. We checked for growth each day.

This is what we saw on Wednesday 2nd May!

On Friday 4th May, our seeds had started to grow their roots.

On Tuesday 8th May, our seeds had really grown a lot! We can see that the roots have grown all along the bottom of the cups and the shoot is starting to appear too.

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By Friday 11th of May, we could see the shoots and roots trying to push out.

 

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We took this picture on Monday 14th of May. We were sop excited to see how much more our seeds have grown and developed. The roots of both seeds are spread around the bottom of the cups and the shoots are big and strong.

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As you can see, the shoots of both of the seeds have burst through the surface completely now. They are very tall and strong. The roots are spreading out even further and are pushing through the cotton wool also.

Today is Monday, 21st of May. Our plants have grown a lot over the weekend, they have tall shoots and bright green leaves now. We think they look great!

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1st Class Science Workshop

On Wednesday March 14th, a scientist came in to work with us. He made ice-cream with Room 10 and he helped us to make our very own indoor volcanoes! We had a great time and got very very messy!! These volcanoes are so easy to make, you can even make them at home! Try it!

We used a biscuit tin, water, flour, baking soda, vinegar, drinks bottle, washing up liquid and food colouring. First we mixed the flour and water together with our hands to make a thick paste, then we pressed and moulded this to the outside of the drinks bottle.

One person poured some washing up liquid into the volcano. Next, we added some food colouring, some groups used red, green AND yellow!! We took turns pouring baking soda and then a little vinegar into the top of the volcano too. What do you think happened next? That’s right, our volcanoes erupted!! The mixture inside the volcano came bubbling out of the top and spilling all over! The volcanoes were great fun to make, though very messy!

Room 9 and Room 10 went out to the yard to see some more science experiments; we watched excitedly as the scientist made lots of loud explosions , it was brilliant! We all think we’d like to become a scientist when we are older!

Check out our photos to see how amazing it was!

6th Class – Rm 6 – By Oisín It’s a Solid… It’s a Liquid… It’s Oobleck

Ooblek is sticky mixture.It contains corn flour and water.I went home and was making play doh with my brother at home for the engineering project called Technology  for life. He mentioned a substance called ooblek. It is sort of like quick sand. When you poke it quickly it will feel like a solid but when you poke it slowly the ooblek it let you go to the bottom. That is because of pressure when you poke it quick all the corn flour particles are forced together but when you poke it slowly the corn flour particles  have time to move out of the way. Ooblek, quicksand and silly putty are all non-Newtonian fluids. This name comes from a Dr Seuss book called Bartholomew and the Ooblek.  

I brought in some corn flour and Miss O’Donnell let me share this experiment with my class. We carried out the experiment in class and here are some pictures.

Battery Experiment Results–6th Class Room 6

Our experiment has finally finished. Our results were very surprising. The results were that the cheap battery expired after 21hrs and 30mins. The expensive battery expired after 21hrs 51 mins. And the rechargeable battery expired after 26hrs 45mins.

 

In our class all children’s predictions showed that each person expected the expensive battery to last the longest. However our experiment proved us wrong. The majority of children in our class predicted that the that the rechargeable battery would last for the least amount of time. However our experiment proved us wrong again and showed us the cheap battery lasted the shortest time.

 

You can see our class predictions on a previous blog which you can go back and see.

 

Maths Trail – 6th Class–Room 6

Yesterday afternoon we got the opportunity to participate in a maths trail around the school grounds. We completed maths work outdoors in the sunshine! We were split up into four groups. Each group needed to have a meter stick, trundle wheel, a watch, pencil and a rubber.

The maths trail was divided into five questions. There were questions involving length, area, 2D shapes, 3D shapes, symmetry, time and bar charts. We were extremely busy.

We all enjoyed being outdoors and at the same time getting the chance to learn.

Here are some pictures of us taking part in the maths trail.

6th Class – Room 6 – Battery Experiment, Update 2

We are very surprised in 6th class at the moment with how are experiment is turning out. At 12:30pm today the light powered by the cheap battery stopped working which means it lasted for 21 hours and 30 minutes. The light bulb powered by the expensive battery stopped working at 12:51pm today which means it lasted for 21 hours and 51 minutes. The light bulb powered by the rechargeable battery is still working at the moment.

6th Class – Room 6 – Battery Experiment Update 1

We connected up our batteries to the light bulbs yesterday afternoon at 2:05pm. We left them on throughout the night and when we returned this morning they were all still working. However at 10:35am today the bulb powered by the cheap battery began to flicker and the light quality dimmed. It is still lighting but it is very dim. The quality of light in the bulb powered by the expensive battery has dimmed slightly. The quality of light in the bulb powered by the rechargeable battery has stayed the same. The light bulbs have now been lighting for the past 21 hours 35 minutes.

Here are the light bulbs at 11:30am today:

6th Class – Room 6 – Science Experiment. Is there a difference in power between cheap batteries, expensive batteries and rechargeable batteries?

We set up our experiment in 6th class today. We have three different types of batteries they are – a cheap battery, an expensive battery and a rechargeable battery. We have connected each battery to the same type of light bulb. Now we just have to wait and see which battery lasts the longest.

Here are our individual predictions for the experiment:

PREDICTIONS – 6TH CLASS – ROOM 6

How long will the battery last?

Cheap Battery

Expensive Battery

Rechargeable Battery

EMELE

29 HOURS

48 HOURS

15 HOURS

JAMES

8 HOURS

20 HOURS

14 HOURS

KELLIANNE

9 HOURS

24 HOURS

10 HOURS

DANEEKA

19 HOURS

27 HOURS

18 HOURS

CLAIRE

18 HOURS

25 HOURS

23 HOURS

EMMA

32 HOURS

53 HOURS

29 HOURS

FINN

26 HOURS

32 HOURS

24 HOURS

DAISY

12 HOURS

15 HOURS

10 HOURS

VICTOR

23 HOURS

34 HOURS

21 HOURS

IOANA

48 HOURS

120 HOURS

24 HOURS

JAMIE

25 HOURS

160 HOURS

22 HOURS

JADE

12 HOURS

86 HOURS

24 HOURS

OISÍN

15 HOURS

26 HOURS

22 HOURS

JULIA

25 HOURS

53 HOURS

22 HOURS

ROSS

22 HOURS

29 HOURS

17 HOURS

KATIE

36 HOURS

50 HOURS

15 HOURS

SHAUNA

20 HOURS

32 HOURS

17 HOURS

MANUEL

27 HOURS

69 HOURS

32 HOURS

CONOR

CLOE

 

Here is the experiment underway in our class:

Technology For Life–Engineering Project

We have been very busy in 6th class recently. We are undertaking an engineering project in our class. The first step for our project was deciding on a local company who develop technology for us to use in our daily lives. We used activity sheet 1 and researched lots of different local companies. As a class we decided to look at INTEL IRELAND for our project.

We are focusing on the micro-chips that INTEL produce. We have to think like engineers for this project therefore we have to go back to the very beginning.

We know that a micro-chip contains many basic circuits but they are more compact. Thinking like engineers we knew we had to find out and understand how a basic circuit works.

On Friday we investigated how a basic circuit works. In pairs we worked independently and tried to complete different tasks that our teachers set for us. However we had to complete the tasks without any help from our teacher.

Each pair received 2 light bulbs, 2 batteries and 3 wires. The first task was just to get one light bulb working. We asked each other lots of questions but had to experiment to find out the answers. After we completed task 1 the next task was to get the bulb working with one battery and one wire, task 3 was to get the light bulb working with two wires and one battery, task 4 was to get 2 light bulbs working with one battery. Eventually everyone in our class completed the tasks successfully.

Over the weekend we had to think about how we could get two light bulbs working with one battery and still have the same light quality. We will be completing this experiment during the week.

QUESTIONING

We asked lots of questions during our investigation and it is up to us to find out the answers.

Here are some of the questions:

1. Is the red wire more powerful than the black wire?

Oisin found out that both wires are exactly the same they just have different colour casing.

2. Does the brand of the battery matter?

3. Does the size of the battery matter?

4. What happens when you use two bulbs and one battery?

5. Are cheap batteries less powerful than expensive ones?

Oisin also found out that cheap batteries normally have a low capacity and expensive batteries generally have a high capacity. Batteries are measured in volts and capacity. Capacity is the ability to provide an electric current for a specified amount of time.

 

INVESTIGATION

We have decided to investigate our question “Are cheap batteries less powerful than expensive ones?” Finn came up with a fair test (a fair test means that everything has an equal opportunity) which was to use 3 of the same brand of torches and put 3 different types of battery in them – cheap battery, expensive battery and rechargeable battery. We are starting our experiment tomorrow and we will be predicting our results first.

We will be back again to report to you our predictions and results of our experiment. We will also have more pictures of our different investigations this week and will keep you up to date with all our questions.

1st Class make a great team!

Here in room 9, we love to work together and are great at helping one another; we have done lots of great activities involving teamwork. We have shown that we have great co-operation skills when we had to listen to the group leaders to untangle our groups and also when we had to listen carefully and follow the instruction of the Pattern Makers (these children told us what order to stand in to make a boy-girl-boy pattern of children). We did a great miming activity on showing and exploring feelings. We had to pretend to give someone a present, they had to use their facial expressions to react to the present without making any noise, it was really funny!