Lego Club ~ ASD Class

Over the last few weeks we worked together at building this Lego set and today we completed it! Each of us played an important role as Engineer, Supplier and Builder. We look forward to building a new Lego set very soon. Below are the following phrases we practiced using during Lego Club:

We need the…

How many do we need?

Good job _______!

Thank you _______.

Do you need some help?

That goes there.

We did it!

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Do Pulley Systems Make Things Lighter?

This year in 6th class for the RDS Science Blast we decided to investigate pulley systems. First we made a single fixed pulley system but discovered that it made no difference to the weight. Then we made a multiple fixed pulley system. We calculated that there was a mechanical advantage of 1.8 with this method. Next we made a multiple pulley system using a movable pulley and a fixed pulley. This had the biggest mechanical advantage 3. Finally we wanted make a structure used in everyday life so we decided on a crane. We made the crane out of modelling wood and used 3 fixed pulleys and 1 moveable pulley. We also made a handle out of an old pencil which attaches to the pulleys and makes the crane work when you wind it. We really enjoyed doing this project.

 

 

 

Designing parachutes in 3rd class

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We had great fun creating and testing our own parachutes in 3rd Class! Each group in the class decided to test a different material when making their parachutes to see which material worked the best. The materials used included tissue, paper, tracing paper, plastic, cardboard and fabric. We discovered that plastic worked the best and gave our pencil passenger the safest, steadiest landing! We also decided to test parachutes of different sizes. We discovered that the larger the surface area of the parachute, the more air resistance it will encounter. This means that larger parachutes will fall more slowly than smaller parachutes.

Eco Friendly Newspaper Bags

Take a look at our Eco friendly bags. We researched gift bags and discovered that the majority of them are made in China. We wanted to reduce the air/land and sea miles used and thereby reduce our carbon footprint by making bags of our own using old newspapers.

Design a Bridge Challenge

Task: Design a bridge

Method:

Using blocks, paper, books and crayons to test we designed bridges to see which ones were stronger and could hold the most amount of crayons. We manipulated our structures to increase their strength by folding the paper used, using double layers of paper, creating arches and structures for extra support.

Conclusion:

The material from which a structure is made is important but you can strengthen a material by changing is shape. Bridge designers often use different shapes for example: arches and triangles. The curve of the arch spreads the load on the bridge and makes it stronger.

 

STEM Launch with the Minister of Education

We were honoured to have the Minister of Education Richard Bruton launch the policy and implementation plan for STEM in education in Ireland. Minister Bruton had the chance to talk to come of the students about what they have been learning in science and maths. Here are a few pictures from the day.

 

 

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The Respiratory System – 5th Class Room 7

We investigated the respiratory system for the science exhibition.

First of all we learned how we breathe and the parts involved in the respiratory system.

We then carried out two experiments: How to Make a Model Set of Lungs and How to Measure Your Lung Capacity.

How To Make a Model Set of Lungs

Equipment needed:

A 2 litre bottle, 2 balloons, blue tack, a rubber glove, sellotape.

Method:

Step 1: First, cut a 2 litre bottle in half.

Step 2: Next, place a straw into a balloon and use sellotape to stick it on. Ensure that there is no air getting through. This will represent our trachea and our lung.

Step 3: Repeat step 2 as we have 2 lungs.

Step 4: Then, place the two lungs through the top of the bottle and secure using blue tack. Again, make sure that there is no air getting through.

Step 5: After that, place a rubber glove on the bottom part of the bottle.

Step 6: Finally, pull down on the rubber glove to show the air coming into the lungs and going out of the lungs.

What We Have Learned:

  • The diaphragm moves down when we breathe in to make room for air in the lungs.
  • The diaphragm moves up when we breathe out pushing out the air.
  • The diaphragm is an important muscle in our breathing system.

How to Measure Your Lung Capacity

Equipment needed:

Permanent marker, 5 litre bottle, basin, plastic tubing

Method:

Step 1: First, using a permanent marker, mark off a 5 litre bottle into 250 millimeter intervals.

Step 2: Next, fill the bottle up with water.

Step 3: Then, place a piece of tubing into the bottle.

Step 4: Ask your friend for some help in placing the bottle into a half filled basin of water. Ensure it is placed in the sink in case there is an over spillage of water.

Step 5: After that, place the tubing in your mouth. Taking an ordinary breath, blow out as much water as you can.

Step 6: Record, in millimeters, how much water you have blown out of the bottle.

Step 7: Then, fill up the bottle again. This time take a deep breath and blow into the bottle.

Step 8: Record, in millimeters, how much water you have blown out of the bottle.

Step 9: Do 15 minutes exercise a day for two and a half weeks.

Step 10: Finally, repeat Steps 2-8 after two and a half weeks.

What We Have Learned:

  • Two people from our class measured their lung capacity before and after 15 minutes of exercise over two and a half weeks
  • The results showed that their lung capacity had increased after two and a half weeks

We also carried out our own research about the respiratory system. This included information about; Smoking and the Lungs, How the Respiratory Works with Other Systems in the Body and Asthma.