Do Pulley Systems Make Things Lighter?

This year in 6th class for the RDS Science Blast we decided to investigate pulley systems. First we made a single fixed pulley system but discovered that it made no difference to the weight. Then we made a multiple fixed pulley system. We calculated that there was a mechanical advantage of 1.8 with this method. Next we made a multiple pulley system using a movable pulley and a fixed pulley. This had the biggest mechanical advantage 3. Finally we wanted make a structure used in everyday life so we decided on a crane. We made the crane out of modelling wood and used 3 fixed pulleys and 1 moveable pulley. We also made a handle out of an old pencil which attaches to the pulleys and makes the crane work when you wind it. We really enjoyed doing this project.

 

 

 

Hydraulic Bridge

This year our class entered the Intel Mini Scientist Competition and our group was lucky enough to be selected to go to the Regional Finals. Our group’s topic was hydraulics, more specifically hydraulic bridges. We chose this topic because last year two people from our
group went to the previous regional final and three other groups did hydraulic arms and we had an interest in the science behind hydraulics. We decided to investigate hydraulic bridges.

At first we found it very difficult to construct the bridge and came across quite a few problems but after a while we figured it out. In November three judges from Intel came in and judged all the classes’ projects. Our group was lucky enough to be selected to go to the Regional Final! In preparation for the Regional Final we decided to make another bridge out of balsa wood. In December our group went to Blanchardstown IT and after a long day of presenting we made it to the National Finals in Maynooth. We were delighted when we found out we were in the top 1% in Ireland. Then the awards were announced but unfortunately we didn’t we win anything but were still extremely proud of ourselves.

Intel Mini Scientist Fair 2017

Our class completed a project on the Respiratory System. Four of us were chosen to attend the Intel Mini Scientist Fair in Blanchardstown IT on the 8th of December 2017 to represent St. Clare’s Primary School. We had great fun presenting our project and got to look at interesting projects from other schools as well.

 

STEM Launch with the Minister of Education

We were honoured to have the Minister of Education Richard Bruton launch the policy and implementation plan for STEM in education in Ireland. Minister Bruton had the chance to talk to come of the students about what they have been learning in science and maths. Here are a few pictures from the day.

 

 

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The Respiratory System – 5th Class Room 7

We investigated the respiratory system for the science exhibition.

First of all we learned how we breathe and the parts involved in the respiratory system.

We then carried out two experiments: How to Make a Model Set of Lungs and How to Measure Your Lung Capacity.

How To Make a Model Set of Lungs

Equipment needed:

A 2 litre bottle, 2 balloons, blue tack, a rubber glove, sellotape.

Method:

Step 1: First, cut a 2 litre bottle in half.

Step 2: Next, place a straw into a balloon and use sellotape to stick it on. Ensure that there is no air getting through. This will represent our trachea and our lung.

Step 3: Repeat step 2 as we have 2 lungs.

Step 4: Then, place the two lungs through the top of the bottle and secure using blue tack. Again, make sure that there is no air getting through.

Step 5: After that, place a rubber glove on the bottom part of the bottle.

Step 6: Finally, pull down on the rubber glove to show the air coming into the lungs and going out of the lungs.

What We Have Learned:

  • The diaphragm moves down when we breathe in to make room for air in the lungs.
  • The diaphragm moves up when we breathe out pushing out the air.
  • The diaphragm is an important muscle in our breathing system.

How to Measure Your Lung Capacity

Equipment needed:

Permanent marker, 5 litre bottle, basin, plastic tubing

Method:

Step 1: First, using a permanent marker, mark off a 5 litre bottle into 250 millimeter intervals.

Step 2: Next, fill the bottle up with water.

Step 3: Then, place a piece of tubing into the bottle.

Step 4: Ask your friend for some help in placing the bottle into a half filled basin of water. Ensure it is placed in the sink in case there is an over spillage of water.

Step 5: After that, place the tubing in your mouth. Taking an ordinary breath, blow out as much water as you can.

Step 6: Record, in millimeters, how much water you have blown out of the bottle.

Step 7: Then, fill up the bottle again. This time take a deep breath and blow into the bottle.

Step 8: Record, in millimeters, how much water you have blown out of the bottle.

Step 9: Do 15 minutes exercise a day for two and a half weeks.

Step 10: Finally, repeat Steps 2-8 after two and a half weeks.

What We Have Learned:

  • Two people from our class measured their lung capacity before and after 15 minutes of exercise over two and a half weeks
  • The results showed that their lung capacity had increased after two and a half weeks

We also carried out our own research about the respiratory system. This included information about; Smoking and the Lungs, How the Respiratory Works with Other Systems in the Body and Asthma.

Science Week 2017

Check out the pictures from Science Week!

 

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What a wonderful week we had! Pupils, teachers and parents all got a chance to participate in the exciting activities throughout the week.

 

2nd class Investigates :The Science of Sound

Experiment 1: Count the Taps!

What were we investigating?

Do sound waves travel better through a gas or a solid?

What did we do?

We learned that the air that we talk through is a gas and it can be interfered with by things like the wind.

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We tested to see if we could count a tapping noise more clearly if we listened with our ear on the desk.

What did we learn?

In a solid you can hear the sound waves clearly. We weren’t sure however, if they were clearer.

Experiment  2: Making Rice Jump

What were we investigating?

Can we see sound waves at work?

What did we do?

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We placed some cling film over a bowl and then placed some rice on top of the cling film. We then banged a drum close to the rice to see if the sound waves could make the rice jump.

What did we learn?

Even from a distance away the sound waves travelled from the drum hit the cling film and made the rice jump. Even though they are invisible we can see the force moving the rice.

Experiment  3: String Phones

What were we investigating?

Can we make a “phone” to send a message from our class across the front of the school to Mr Scott’s room (Room 5)?

What did we do?

Step 1: We designed and made our own string phone’s and tested them to see if they worked.

 

One group tried putting two strings in their phone.(It didn’t seem  to work any better)

Step 2: We measured to see how far apart our phones stretched and we tested to see if the sound got weaker on the longest phones.

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Step 3: We then made another test string phone 4 metres long and we tested to see if it still worked.

Step 4: We measured the distance from our classroom to Mr Scott’s using a trundle wheel. It was  21 metres and 61 centimetres window to window.

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Step 5: We made our new extra-long string phone. We sent a group down to Room 5  to listen for the message and left  two children in our class to call  it out.  Nobody but the callers knew the message (It was: “ Ireland are going to win!”).

 

 

Step 6: We  decided to do a final test to see if we could “listen in” on the line between the two classrooms.

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What did we learn?

We learned lots but the most important bits are:

  • The string has to be pulled tight for the phone to work well
  • Putting two strings on the phone might actually make it harder to hear a message.
  • The quality of the phone does not diminish between 1 and 4 metres.
  • On a very long string- phone the message isn’t as clear as on a short one but we were still able to  work  out the message that was transmitted.
  • By attaching another string to the main line we can “listen in”.