Spring has Sprung! ~ ASD Class

Today we were lucky to observe, not one, but three Giant African Land Snails! We discussed their size, their shells and what they like to eat. Afterwards, we made our way to the Outdoor Classroom to have a look at the hundreds of tadpoles in the pond. There, we discussed the lifecycle of the frog and took some time to bask in the sunshine on the benches.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Intel Mini Scientist Fair 2017

Our class completed a project on the Respiratory System. Four of us were chosen to attend the Intel Mini Scientist Fair in Blanchardstown IT on the 8th of December 2017 to represent St. Clare’s Primary School. We had great fun presenting our project and got to look at interesting projects from other schools as well.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

The Respiratory System – 5th Class Room 7

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We investigated the respiratory system for the science exhibition.

First of all we learned how we breathe and the parts involved in the respiratory system.

We then carried out two experiments: How to Make a Model Set of Lungs and How to Measure Your Lung Capacity.

How To Make a Model Set of Lungs

Equipment needed:

A 2 litre bottle, 2 balloons, blue tack, a rubber glove, sellotape.

Method:

Step 1: First, cut a 2 litre bottle in half.

Step 2: Next, place a straw into a balloon and use sellotape to stick it on. Ensure that there is no air getting through. This will represent our trachea and our lung.

Step 3: Repeat step 2 as we have 2 lungs.

Step 4: Then, place the two lungs through the top of the bottle and secure using blue tack. Again, make sure that there is no air getting through.

Step 5: After that, place a rubber glove on the bottom part of the bottle.

Step 6: Finally, pull down on the rubber glove to show the air coming into the lungs and going out of the lungs.

What We Have Learned:

  • The diaphragm moves down when we breathe in to make room for air in the lungs.
  • The diaphragm moves up when we breathe out pushing out the air.
  • The diaphragm is an important muscle in our breathing system.

How to Measure Your Lung Capacity

Equipment needed:

Permanent marker, 5 litre bottle, basin, plastic tubing

Method:

Step 1: First, using a permanent marker, mark off a 5 litre bottle into 250 millimeter intervals.

Step 2: Next, fill the bottle up with water.

Step 3: Then, place a piece of tubing into the bottle.

Step 4: Ask your friend for some help in placing the bottle into a half filled basin of water. Ensure it is placed in the sink in case there is an over spillage of water.

Step 5: After that, place the tubing in your mouth. Taking an ordinary breath, blow out as much water as you can.

Step 6: Record, in millimeters, how much water you have blown out of the bottle.

Step 7: Then, fill up the bottle again. This time take a deep breath and blow into the bottle.

Step 8: Record, in millimeters, how much water you have blown out of the bottle.

Step 9: Do 15 minutes exercise a day for two and a half weeks.

Step 10: Finally, repeat Steps 2-8 after two and a half weeks.

What We Have Learned:

  • Two people from our class measured their lung capacity before and after 15 minutes of exercise over two and a half weeks
  • The results showed that their lung capacity had increased after two and a half weeks

We also carried out our own research about the respiratory system. This included information about; Smoking and the Lungs, How the Respiratory Works with Other Systems in the Body and Asthma.

Exercise and your Heart

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

In fourth class we have been busy testing our heart rates. Before exercise we tested children’s heart rates using the heart rate monitor. After the exercise we tested them again to see if there was any change in their heart rates. The heart rate monitor told us how many times their heart beat per minute (bpm). Here are some of the results we collected.

Results

Kalya                Before exercise 96bpm

                          After exercise 120bpm

Oliver                Before exercise 90bpm

                           After exercise 130bpm

Declan              Before exercise 78bpm

                          After exercise 135bpm

Oscar               Before exercise 150bpm

                          After exercise 200bpm

 Conclusion

We found out that your heart rate changes after exercise. It beats faster. Oscar had a high heart rate before exercise and we know this was because he was nervous and excited about using the heart rate monitor. He was also doing a lot of talking at the beginning!!

For the next few weeks we are hoping to use the heart rate monitor before and after P.E every week.

The Heart

IMG_20171117_124539We have been learning all about the heart in fourth class. Here are some interesting facts about the heart.

Did you know?

  • The heart pumps blood to all parts of the body.
  • The blood brings oxygen to the muscles.
  • Heart rate increases with exercise so that more of the oxygen carried in the blood can reach the muscles.
  • The fitter you are, the quicker your heart rate returns to normal.
  • An adult’s heart rate is around 70 beats per minute, and a child’s is a bit higher.
  • A mouse’s is about 500 beats per minute, and an elephant’s is about 25 beats per minute!
  • Our hearts are pumping at a regular rate. This pumping can be felt by placing fingers across the pulse point at the wrist or the neck, and the rate can be counted.
  • Your heart is about the same size as your fist, and weighs about the same amount as a lemon.
  • Your heart is located in your chest, near your lungs, and to the left of the hard bone in the middle of your chest (the breastbone).
  • Your heart is an organ made of muscle.
  • The heart is an important organ in the body. It helps deliver oxygen and nutrients that are in the blood to all the other organs in the body.