6th Class, Room 5 Egg Drop Challenge

This week Sixth Class had to put their engineering caps on and complete the EGG DROP CHALLENGE!!

The objective was to design a landing craft that would protect an egg from cracking or breaking from a high fall. Each student had to design, build and test their landing craft for homework. They made them using a variety of materials, such as, show boxes, pillows, plastic bags and popcorn.  Many students also made parachutes and wings to help their landing craft.

We had great fun testing them and checking to see whether our eggs ‘survived’ the drop. In the end, we only broke three eggs!

Have a look at some of our EGG-CELLENT landing crafts!

The Globe Project – 5th Class Room 7

This year, as part of the GLOBE initiative, our class has been examining the weather in the school environment. We have been analysing clouds and measuring the amount of Particulate Matter (PM) in the air using our cloud charts and the Calitoo instrument. We have also been measuring the amount of rainfall using our rain gauge and examining the temperature and barometric pressure using a thermometer and a barometer. Every time we completed our analysis, we recorded the data onto the GLOBE website.

Some students in our class made a homemade thermometer and barometer to see if they could be used as an accurate way of reading the temperature and the barometric pressure. We compared our results to the actual readings on the thermometer and barometer in our instrument shelter.

This year, we were given special test tubes which measured the amount of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the school environment. Nitrogen dioxide is generated when nitrogen from the car engine mixes with oxygen in the air. We chose to place these test tubes in three locations around the school. These locations were; the school gate, the staff car park and the school garden. We made predictions about which location we felt would have the most and least amount of NO2.

Results:

School gate: 26. 85 (µg/m3)

Staff car park: 24.85 (µg/m3)

School garden: 20.92 (µg/m3)

Our predictions were correct!

NO2 concentration (µg/m3) Description
50 + Extremely bad
45 – 50 Very bad
40 to 45 Bad
35 – 40 Substandard
30 – 35 Mediocre
25 – 30 Average
20 – 25 Pretty good
15 to 20 Good
10 to 15 Very good
0-10 Excellent

From there, we decided to complete a project on acid rain as our research told us that nitrogen oxides are present in acid rain. We completed 3 experiments.

Acid Attack: This involved us placing 5 bean seeds on damp cotton wool which were on two jam jar lids. Each day, a student from our class sprinkled both lids with  water and poured lemon juice on just one of the lids (labelled acid rain). This was used to show how acid rain affects vegetation.

We also took a piece of cement and placed it in a jar of vinegar to show the affect of acid rain on buildings.

Acid Rain Indicator:  This involved us making an acid indicator from red cabbage. We tested the rainwater in our school environment. We compared our results to a jam jar with baking soda and a jam jar with vinegar. This enabled us to identify whether the rain water was acidic.

The Water Cycle: We placed a food bag with some water out on the window sill in the sunshine which demonstrated how acid rain is made and falls.

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Results: 

Acid Attack: The beans on the lid labelled acid rain were more eroded than the beans which had no lemon juice on them.

Acid Rain Indicator:  The acid jar turned a pink colour and the base jar turned a light purple. The rainwater in our environment was neutral as the colour of the indicator did not change.

The Water Cycle: This demonstrated how acid rain is made and falls to the ground through the water cycle.

 

Parachutes & Helicopters in Room 6:

We explored gravity and air resistance by designing and making our own parachutes and paper helicopters.

First, we watched Felix Baumgartner’s skydive from Space and discussed what forces we could see in action.

We then designed our own parachutes and landing crafts for an egg. We wanted to see if we could land them safely without cracking the egg. We used a range of materials to create our parachutes. Three out of six of our parachutes were successful!

Here are some of our designs and parachutes:

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We also created paper helicopters. We dropped them from the same height repeatedly. We found the average time it took for them to fall. Then, each group adapted their helicopter to see if they could increase the time spent in the air.

Here is what our paper helicopters originally looked like:

Picture1

Lung Experiment- 4th Class Room 8

Lung Experiment

Equipment- 3 balloons, 3 straws, plastic bottle, scissors, glue and sellotape. (Rubber Glove)

Method

  1. Cut plastic bottle in half using scissors.
  2. Cut straws and glue together.
  3. Secure balloon to end of each straw with tape.
  4. Make hole in lid and put straw through and secure.
  5. Cut other balloon in half and tape to the bottom of bottle.

Result- When we pulled the balloon at the bottom of the bottle it did not work. We replaced it with a rubber glove. When we pulled the glove down the balloons expanded.

Conclusion- When we breathe (inhale) the diaphragm pulls down making the chest expand. This causes air to be sucked into the lungs. When the diaphragm relaxes the air is pushed out of the lungs (exhale).

Do Pulley Systems Make Things Lighter?

This year in 6th class for the RDS Science Blast we decided to investigate pulley systems. First we made a single fixed pulley system but discovered that it made no difference to the weight. Then we made a multiple fixed pulley system. We calculated that there was a mechanical advantage of 1.8 with this method. Next we made a multiple pulley system using a movable pulley and a fixed pulley. This had the biggest mechanical advantage 3. Finally we wanted make a structure used in everyday life so we decided on a crane. We made the crane out of modelling wood and used 3 fixed pulleys and 1 moveable pulley. We also made a handle out of an old pencil which attaches to the pulleys and makes the crane work when you wind it. We really enjoyed doing this project.

 

 

 

Hydraulic Bridge

This year our class entered the Intel Mini Scientist Competition and our group was lucky enough to be selected to go to the Regional Finals. Our group’s topic was hydraulics, more specifically hydraulic bridges. We chose this topic because last year two people from our
group went to the previous regional final and three other groups did hydraulic arms and we had an interest in the science behind hydraulics. We decided to investigate hydraulic bridges.

At first we found it very difficult to construct the bridge and came across quite a few problems but after a while we figured it out. In November three judges from Intel came in and judged all the classes’ projects. Our group was lucky enough to be selected to go to the Regional Final! In preparation for the Regional Final we decided to make another bridge out of balsa wood. In December our group went to Blanchardstown IT and after a long day of presenting we made it to the National Finals in Maynooth. We were delighted when we found out we were in the top 1% in Ireland. Then the awards were announced but unfortunately we didn’t we win anything but were still extremely proud of ourselves.