The Globe Project – 5th Class Room 7

This year, as part of the GLOBE initiative, our class has been examining the weather in the school environment. We have been analysing clouds and measuring the amount of Particulate Matter (PM) in the air using our cloud charts and the Calitoo instrument. We have also been measuring the amount of rainfall using our rain gauge and examining the temperature and barometric pressure using a thermometer and a barometer. Every time we completed our analysis, we recorded the data onto the GLOBE website.

Some students in our class made a homemade thermometer and barometer to see if they could be used as an accurate way of reading the temperature and the barometric pressure. We compared our results to the actual readings on the thermometer and barometer in our instrument shelter.

This year, we were given special test tubes which measured the amount of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the school environment. Nitrogen dioxide is generated when nitrogen from the car engine mixes with oxygen in the air. We chose to place these test tubes in three locations around the school. These locations were; the school gate, the staff car park and the school garden. We made predictions about which location we felt would have the most and least amount of NO2.

Results:

School gate: 26. 85 (µg/m3)

Staff car park: 24.85 (µg/m3)

School garden: 20.92 (µg/m3)

Our predictions were correct!

NO2 concentration (µg/m3) Description
50 + Extremely bad
45 – 50 Very bad
40 to 45 Bad
35 – 40 Substandard
30 – 35 Mediocre
25 – 30 Average
20 – 25 Pretty good
15 to 20 Good
10 to 15 Very good
0-10 Excellent

From there, we decided to complete a project on acid rain as our research told us that nitrogen oxides are present in acid rain. We completed 3 experiments.

Acid Attack: This involved us placing 5 bean seeds on damp cotton wool which were on two jam jar lids. Each day, a student from our class sprinkled both lids with  water and poured lemon juice on just one of the lids (labelled acid rain). This was used to show how acid rain affects vegetation.

We also took a piece of cement and placed it in a jar of vinegar to show the affect of acid rain on buildings.

Acid Rain Indicator:  This involved us making an acid indicator from red cabbage. We tested the rainwater in our school environment. We compared our results to a jam jar with baking soda and a jam jar with vinegar. This enabled us to identify whether the rain water was acidic.

The Water Cycle: We placed a food bag with some water out on the window sill in the sunshine which demonstrated how acid rain is made and falls.

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Results: 

Acid Attack: The beans on the lid labelled acid rain were more eroded than the beans which had no lemon juice on them.

Acid Rain Indicator:  The acid jar turned a pink colour and the base jar turned a light purple. The rainwater in our environment was neutral as the colour of the indicator did not change.

The Water Cycle: This demonstrated how acid rain is made and falls to the ground through the water cycle.

 

Engineering Week 2019- 4th Class Room 12

For ‘Engineering Week 2019’, we have been learning about different types of engineers and their various roles.

After discovering some really interesting facts, we were tasked with an engineering challenge of our own!

We had to work as an engineer to design and construct a rubber band powered car.

We began by exploring our materials (cardboard, axles, wheels, elastic band, paper clip) and planning our design.

Then we moved onto the construction stage. This involved folding the cardboard into a box shape (also known as a chassis) and fitting the axles through the front and rear holes on the chassis. Next, we had to fit wheels to the end of each axel. Finally, we had to wrap the rubber band around the rear axle and then attach the rubber band to a fixed position on the front axle of the car.

Although we found it rather difficult to fit the rubber bands, we eventually managed to complete the design.

The final part of our challenge required us to test the rubber band car.

To do so ,we hand to wind up the real axle that was attached to the rubber band and then let it go. This caused the car to move forward.

Our conclusion:

When you wind up the car’s axle you stretch the rubber band and store potential energy. When you release it the rubber band starts to unwind, and the potential energy is converted to kinetic energy as the car is propelled forward.

 

 

Designing parachutes in 3rd class

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We had great fun creating and testing our own parachutes in 3rd Class! Each group in the class decided to test a different material when making their parachutes to see which material worked the best. The materials used included tissue, paper, tracing paper, plastic, cardboard and fabric. We discovered that plastic worked the best and gave our pencil passenger the safest, steadiest landing! We also decided to test parachutes of different sizes. We discovered that the larger the surface area of the parachute, the more air resistance it will encounter. This means that larger parachutes will fall more slowly than smaller parachutes.

Testing Materials in 1st Class

In Ms. Ryan’s 1st Class we investigated different materials to see which ones were waterproof. We used Buster the puppet to help us. We predicted if the following materials were waterproof; rubber, cotton, nylon, plastic and tin-foil. We recorded our predictions.

We tested the materials by wrapping a piece of each one around Buster’s arm. Buster’s arm was dipped into the water for thirty seconds each time. We then checked to see if his arm was wet or dry. If his arm was dry it showed us that the material was waterproof. Sadly, poor Buster got wet when we tested the cotton, nylon and tin-foil as these are not waterproof. We would not recommend using these materials when making a raincoat.

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5th Class Room 7 – The Human Eye

5th Class Room 7 have been extremely busy researching information about the human eye. We learned all about the human eye, it’s parts and their functions. After that, we split into groups and researched topics relating to the human eye that are of interest to us; Optical Illusions and Braille. We also completed 3 surveys on the topics of eye colour, glasses and contact lenses and what you could see in one particular optical illusion.

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The Globe Project – 4th Class Room 6 and 5th Class Room 7

Today we completed cloud observations in groups. We examined the clouds in the sky and then some of us were given the opportunity to use the CALITOO. This instrument measures the amount of aerosols (particles) in the air. We hope to be uploading this data to the GLOBE website in the coming weeks. P1030922