A Visit to Harold’s Cross Bridge and Portobello Bridge by 5th Class Room 6

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We developed a number of questions and put them on clip boards.
In our research we discovered that there are a number of types of bridges including arch bridges and beam bridges.
We observed that Harold’s Cross Bridge is an arch shaped bridge
while Portobello Bridge is beam shaped.
Portobello Bridge has a lock. The ropes can be released to open
the lock gates and increase the water levels and allow boats through.

IZAK 9 – Fourth Class

Fourth class have been using IZAK 9 this year to help improve their maths and problem solving skills. IZAK 9 is a large cube that is made up of 27 smaller individual cubes that can be arranged and rearranged in different ways in order to solve a variety of problems. It is great fun and helps us to learn. Here are some photos of our class with their IZAK 9 kits.-

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The Globe Project – 4th Class Room 6 and 5th Class Room 7

Today we completed cloud observations in groups. We examined the clouds in the sky and then some of us were given the opportunity to use the CALITOO. This instrument measures the amount of aerosols (particles) in the air. We hope to be uploading this data to the GLOBE website in the coming weeks. P1030922

Eco Friendly Newspaper Bags

Take a look at our Eco friendly bags. We researched gift bags and discovered that the majority of them are made in China. We wanted to reduce the air/land and sea miles used and thereby reduce our carbon footprint by making bags of our own using old newspapers.

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The Power of Magnets – 3rd Class Room 11

Introduction: Magnets have the ability to attract certain metals like iron and steel.

Metal paper clips are made from steel and should be attracted by a magnet but can a magnet attract a paper clip through a solid?

Hypothesis: Magnets can work through solid objects.

Materials: cardboard, plastic cars, magnets, paper clips, sign posts, markers.


  1. Outlined two racing tracks with marker
  2. Attached a paper clip to each car
  3. Two magnets were placed underneath the racing board
  4. ‘Start’ and ‘Finish’ flags were placed at either end of the racing board

Results: Racing board – the magnet had to work through a thicker piece of material but the magnet was also further from the paper clip which makes it harder for the magnet to attract it.

Conclusion: Yes, a magnet can work through solid objects.

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